Wome by Women with Marcelina Amelia.

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Marcelina Amelia Detox 841cm x 69cm web

Marcelina Amelia, Detox, Fine art limited edition print on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper with deckled edges, 84.1cm x 69cm, Signed and numbered edition of 60, £450 (unframed)

Marcelina Amelia How To Fill The Void 841cm x 69cm web

Marcelina Amelia, How To Fill The Void, Fine art limited edition print on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper with deckled edges, 84.1cm x 69cm, Signed and numbered edition of 60, £450 (unframed)

 

Marcelina Amelia How To Live 841cm x 69cm web

Marcelina Amelia, How To Live, Fine art limited edition print, Signed and numbered edition of 60, Printed on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper with deckled edges, 84.1cm x 69cm, £450 (unframed)

 

Marcelina Amelia Law of attraction 17 x 54 cm web

Marcelina Amelia, Law of attraction, Fine art limited edition print hand-finished with acrylic paint and oil pastel, Printed on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper with deckled edges, 70cm X 54cm unframed, Signed and numbered edition of 70, £350 (unframed)

 

Marcelina Amelia Mother Goddess 84cm x 59cm web

Marcelina Amelia, Mother Goddess, Archival pigment inks on paper, 84cm x 59cm, Unframed Signed Limited Edition of 50, £420 (unframed)

Additional artwork available, new 2020 prints:

 SUPERSTITIONS mocap mediumres web

Marcelina Amelia, Superstitions, Archival pigment ink print on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper hand finished with acrylic paint with hand torn deckled edges, 90cm x 64.75cm, Signed and numbered edition of 80, £470.00 unframed

STRAWFROMTHESHOES mocap medium res web

Marcelina Amelia, Straw from the shoes protrudes, Archival pigment ink print on Somerset Velvet 330gsm paper hand finished with acrylic paint with hand torn deckled edges, 90cm x 64.75cm, Signed and numbered edition of 80, Each print is hand coloured - therefore each print is unique, £470.00 unframed

 

Marcelina Amelia is a UK based contemporary artist working with mixed media approaches to print, painting and drawing. She often draws inspirations from her Polish heritage, looking to religious iconography and folk tales, as well as childhood memories, the power of dreams, spirituality, sexuality, and the human condition. She has been featured in publications including Booooooom, Bomb, Art Maze, Create Magazine, Digital Arts, Vogue, Refinery29, The NY Times, Der Spiegel and Ballad Of Magazine. She exhibits work throughout the UK as well as internationally and was a featured artist of the 2017 edition of the London Illustration fair and led a The Big Draw sketch walk for Apple. Marcelina is also a founder of artbrand Mesh Studio. 

Marcelina Amelia - ‘I like to play at the tense borders between lust and innocence; joy and sadness; fun and pain.  My interest in juxtaposition comes from my origins and fascination with East European culture which was eloquently described by Grayson Perry as ‘nowhere else could such horrific grief be met with such fairly-tale romanticism’. ‘I tend to utilise nature as a metaphor for everyday feelings and headaches. My recent work also dwells into themes of self-acceptance, body positivity, representations of the female sexuality, gender, migration, and society. Although some of the subjects I take on are often quite dark I like to think that there is some humour and light in my finished artwork.’

In the build up to the exhibition we reached out to Marcelina Amelia to find out more about her and her work.

At ROSL we are so glad to have you showing in the gallery for the upcoming show Women by Women. Can you talk a little bit about the work you are contributing?

Most of the work I’m contributing to the show are from my “I only want everything” collection.

 ‘I Only Want Everything’ is a wry comment on the twenty-first-century culture of ‘on-demand’ materialism. Deeply self-aware - and a more than a little satirical - my pieces are meant to remind us to pause, look up, and enjoy the beauty of art, life, and our colourful surroundings.

Is there something particularly relevant between your life experiences and the art you produce? 

I like to think of my work as existential smoothies of reality. Each piece I have created is tightly connected to my life and the observations of the people around me, all of my work is very personal. I remember Marina Abramovic once said that what makes an artist is their biography, and I definitely agree with that quote, as the art that usually speaks to me has a strong motional charge and a kind of honesty about it that you can just see and feel. So I tend to transform experiences from my own life, sometimes those bluer and darker ones and make them into something completely new and something that feels empowering to me, I guess it’s my own way of healing and navigating in this world.

Can you describe one artwork or series from your oeuvre that you feel was pivotal in your career.

I think the painting that then turned into a hand-finished limited edition titled ‘How to Fill the Void’ Which is another story from the ‘I Only Want Everything’ series was quite important to me.

‘How to Fill the Void’. It’s a journey of self-discovery; questioning the participatory, fast paced, performative world we live in right now, overloaded with information and ideas of exceptionalism, where it is easier to be lost in the stream than to be your own person. Each painting in this series is representing a different emotional state, an identity crisis. How do we satisfy that craving, when in our essence, we are 99.9% empty space?

Do you have any other artists that you look to as inspiration? What makes a great artist?

My first art crush was an Austrian painter Egon Schiele and his maestro Gustav Klimt; I’ll never forget the moment when I saw their work for the first time. Without exaggeration, it has changed my life. I must have been 14/15 years old then, already an owner of an extensive collection of self-initiated sketchbooks. Since I was a little girl I have been a compulsive sketcher, but I didn’t think anything of my scribbles until I saw Egon’s work. There are so many artists, writers, directors that I admire, but I would like to highlight  Marina Abramović for her spirituality, Tracy Emin for her honesty, Picasso for being so bold and prolific, Jean Michael Basquiat and the charged photography of Nan Golding. I must also list Federico Fellini especially his movie 8 1/2, I remember seeing it was very important in shaping my relationship and my connection to my inner world. Ah and Marlene Dumas, Danny Fox, Mattise! There are too many to list!

As for what makes a great artist I would say again honesty. All of the artists I have listed I feel like they weren’t afraid of showing who they really are and producing the work that they really felt like making, not following the current trends, they were sticking to their “guns” no matter what.

What advice would you give to emerging artists entering the art world?

I would say that being talented and hardworking is not enough. You have to be incredibly resilient and prepared to hear a lot of no’s and also be prepared that people will doubt you, questions your choices and think that your ideas are weak and perhaps you are being unrealistic and too ambitions.

My best advice would be to just never give up and to do what you really believe in no matter what. Which I know can be super hard sometimes and you have to have unlimited amounts of self believe.